Android Security: Google or Carriers issue?

In the world of Android a couple of disturbing articles have come out recently. Google is no long patching 4.3 (Jellybean) and earlier versions. Also the amount of malware for Android increased by 75% last year. This begs, who is to receive blame on the vendor side?

We all know people do not patch apps. Maybe they don’t like “new” terms that come with the update (most terms are the same as the prior versions). A lot get not the best information. Patching is important, and we all know that. In the world of PC’s we all know about Patch Tuesday (Microsoft, Adobe), and know how long it can take Apple to patch flaws in OSX and iOS (which they completely control and is out of the carriers hands). So what about Android, the worlds most popular phone OS?

The announcement this week that Google is no long patching WebView for versions 4.3 and earlier started me thinking more about this. Yes, Google is “abandoning” 930 Million users. Yes, They come out with new versions of Android so fast that the OS is fractured all over the place. The question is though, is Google doing the right thing? I personally think so. The reasoning why places a bunch of blame on the carriers.

Outside of iOS (iPhone), the carriers control when consumers get updates to their Android (and Windows) phones. In the world of Android, Google announces a patch, update, new version, then it gets sent to the device manufacturers. They have to test against their hardware and customization that they have done to Android for their devices (the look and feel of the OS you see). Then it gets sent to the carriers (Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, etc.) where even more testing has to be done against the carriers modifications to the OS (special built in apps, their radios, any network lock downs or features such as tracking cookies). Basically once Google releases the new version/patch/update getting it onto most peoples phones is out of their hands, the exception being the Nexus devices which Google controls. The longer an update take to get out there, the more chance there is for a breach. The easier it also may be for malware to get on the phones, and could be a reason the amount of malware for Android increased by 75% last year.

So the question arises, why does it take so long to hit our phones. the obvious and simple answer to me is money. Why bother pushing patches and updates, let alone new versions of the OS to phones especially ones that are only a year or two old, when you can try to force people to get new hardware, and either extend or get new contracts to get the latest? Security as a Service you can almost think of it as, but not quite. Seriously, the carriers have a cash cow on their hands with Android and doing things this way. The lastest verion of iOS is out and works on phones that are years old. Apple has it available for those older phones through their updater, although some features may not work on the older phones, it is still available. I am by no means an Apple fan, but the control they have over their updates is what Google needs to have over Android. The carriers don’t care, and won’t unless they lose some major lawsuit because someone’s phone got hacked due to a security update not having been available for that model. When I tweeted to my carrier (Verizon) about this, they sent me a link to their “news” page which has no information on updates. I also tweeted them back as they asked about what I was looking for (latest Windows Phone update, Android Lollipop) for specific devices. Never heard back from them.

The bottom line on this, from my perspective, is that both Google and the carriers are to blame. Google is to blame, not for not patching, but for not controlling the push out of patches and updates to the OS, and the carriers for not pushing out updates and patches in a timely fashion. Until this gets resolved, Android is going to stay heavily fragmented, and security for everyday peoples phones is going to be shaky at best.

Can Infosec get ahead of the Blackhats?

It is described at times as an arms race. Information Security always seems to be behind the bad guys. Can this ever change?

We all know the routine by now. New exploit, new signatures, new patches, new updates, new exploits. Rinse, lather, and repeat. We hear of the next big thing to be adaptive. Heuristic scanning, signature scanning, IDS, IPS, all to mitigate the threats. We are always fighting the good fight from behind. Unfortunately, this will always be the case. Yes, we get faster, not as far behind, and better. Yes, we have people on our side actively looking for the latest exploits. It is a neck and neck race in this day and age, but the fact remains, the bad guys will always find something we haven’t. We do our best to mitigate. We know that people are the weakest link. We try to educate, but even the best education, following the best practices will not stop exploitable scenarios, be they human or code. Why? Because we are human and are flawed.

Now don’t think that I am all doom and gloom. We have made great strides forward, and will continue to do so. Truth be told though, their are only a few ways to even have a chance of truly stopping the situation, and they are either super extreme or extremely improbable.

First idea I have is to have, as was a tag line from the movie Sneakers, “No More Secrets.” If everyone from corporations, to governments were wide open about everything, then what is there left to steal? Just money which brings me to the second thought. Go back to the bartering system. This gets rid of the money issue, and actually makes sense. Trading goods and services for other goods and services. Now you don’t need credit cards, Money, bank accounts, etc… The other big one that gets brought up in my mind is of course getting rid of technology all together.

None of these ideas are practical of course, so we are back to the original thought here. Can we ever get ahead. More thank likely not, but we keep getting closer to being even. So keep training, keep educating others, and keep your wits about you. We are in for a bumpy ride.

Security – Open Source vs. Closed: It’s a matter of eyes

For years there has been the whole what is more secure, Open or Closed source? Microsoft has and still takes a beating over this. Truth, though, is a different thing.

We all have heard of Heartbleed by now. The 2 year old security gap in OpenSSL has been all over the news. During all of this, a hole in the much loved Chrome browser that will allow websites to turn on your microphone and record what you are saying was announced. Another bug that had been around for a while (August 2013). Meanwhile, the hated entity known as Microsoft has been pretty much unaffected by these issues. Maybe it is time to remove our preconceived and ancient thought over security in the Open vs. Closed Source world.

The argument has been, from what I have heard and can tell, that Open Source is more secure because you have more eyes looking at it. The code is open and out there so people can find the issues faster and with the collaborative nature of Open Source, will be patched faster. Truth of the matter, as has been shown over the past week, is that it is not the case, and security holes can get past this set of checks and balances just as they can in any Closed Source system. The surprising thing is how long it has taken to find Heartbleed. One would think, with all those eyes looking at the code, that it would have been found much sooner. Of course this has led to the theories of the bug being an NSA backdoor. True or not, the code was still out there for everyone to see.

Chrome is a slightly different issue. Here is a bug that was found over 6 months ago, that still hasn’t been patched. It was brought to Google’s attention and they sat on it. Could this be another NSA (or insert your favorite Government agency here) backdoor? A way to spy on you without warrants? We will never know for sure, but it does show one major hole. Our thinking of Open Source and security is not completely correct. It is not the be all end all.

What has been lost in this is that Microsoft, and its Closed Source implementations of SSL have been free and clear of the Heartbleed problem. Microsoft at one time was awful with security. In this day and age though, it has gotten a lot better. It is responsive to holes, and the amount of out-of-band patches and workarounds for Zero Days is quite speedy. In fact the biggest security holes in Microsoft systems, is usually Java and/or Flash. Flash is still Closed Source, but Java was at one point more open. Java also is embedded in the web very deep. Try using NoScript at it’s tightest levels and see how much of websites get blocked, and how many websites complain about Java not being turned on. Yet through all of this, Microsoft is the one that still takes the blame, especially in the public’s eye. That is because we, the ones in the know, have done little to reeducate the public, and ourselves.

Do not get me wrong. I have nothing but love for the Open Source community. Collaborative efforts are awesome, and the community puts out some fantastic software, and alternatives to Closed Source (and overpriced) programs. It just has to be realized that it is no more secure than Closed Source. In the end it is all about the eyes on the code and the people looking for the holes. Remember Security is a process, not a destination.